Archives for : October2018

October Brings Nostalgia for all Things Warm and Cozy

October brings nostalgia for all things warm and cozy. And though most of us are far removed from hunting and gathering in the old sense of living off whatever we could produce on our own land, as the days get shorter and darkness closes in earlier, there seems to be a natural sense of wanting to gather in.

We love the idea of warmth, security, and belonging. All of us long to be cherished by someone.

Some people are fortunate enough to be part of a loving family. Others are blessed with many friends.

Yet others feel unloved and are very much alone.

No matter what your situation might be at this point in your life, there is One who loves you very much.

  • The Bible paints a wonderful picture of “a Friend who sticks closer than a brother” (Proverbs 18:24, NIV) –the kind of friend we would all love to have!

 

  • Another passage says “Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” (John 15:13, NIV). We may not know a single person who would take a bullet for us.

 

  • But the Bible’s most famous verse of all says, “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. (John 3:16, NIV)

 

So even if you’re feeling a bit lonely during these short days and long nights, remember: You have a Friend in high places–Someone who would love to make friends with you!

Sharon Sheppard

 

A Fireplace and a Stack of Books

A Fireplace and a Stack of Books: What more could a couple of English majors possibly want?

By Sharon Sheppard

The circumstances surrounding what could have been our own “winter of our discontent” (to quote from a famous first line in Shakespeare’s Richard III), looked bleak. The doctors had pretty much reached the end of treatment options for my husband’s multiple myeloma.

But some of the most precious times in our marriage occurred during those last months of his life as we spent wonderful hours in front of our cozy stone fireplace indulging in our passion for reading.

As ex-English teachers and avid readers, we now had lots of uninterrupted time to read. Often with a snack or a hot drink and the warmth and crackle of the fire, we were in a cocoon of our own making. And reading books out loud to each other gave us the chance to comment, agree or disagree, critique, debate, and laugh together.

The books we chose were, in many cases, lighter reading than the kinds of literature we had both read in college. But they were no less enjoyable. Each evening we began by reading from The Message, The New Testament in Contemporary English, for a fresh look at Scripture.

Then we read historical novels by Bodie Thoene, including her World War II series chronicling the era my husband’s father and uncles had spent in the military, followed by her series about the establishment of the nation of Israel. We read several political thrillers from a more contemporary era—nail-biters by Joel Rosenberg involving scenarios as up-to-date as current newspapers.

But what is most memorable about those evenings of reading is simply the shared coziness, warmth, and closeness of those quiet evenings by the fire: The gift of books and contentment on borrowed time.

The Best Tomato Soup

Wow! Where did summer go? Seems like the weather dropped 20 degrees overnight from a hot humid 92◦ to a comfortable sleep with windows open. I would say fall is upon us in all its glory. The leaves are turning a golden color, the smell of bonfires is in the air, and the soup kettle is simmering on the stove as I write. I think you will enjoy this recipe. It is not complicated, but hearty and healthy.

 

The Best Tomato Soup

Ingredients

14 oz. can of crushed tomatoes (or from summer surplus in the garden)

28 oz. can of peeled tomatoes

2 Tbsp. chopped Basil

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 onion and 4 cloves of garlic

4 cups of chicken stock

1 cup of whole milk

1 cup of 1/2 & ½ cream

Tbsp. butter

1/4 cup flour

1 (oz. fresh) tortellini (I like with cheese)

 

Instructions

Sauté the onion in melted butter right in a soup pot. Add the garlic, salt and basil the last few minutes of the sauté process. Add the chicken stock and tomatoes, when gently simmering, add the flour, with about 1/3 cup of the milk, whisking to make it smooth. Slowly stir this mixture into the pot.  Allow the soup to simmer for about an hour. The last ½ hour add the rest of the milk, cream, and the tortellini until the tortellini is cooked through.

(The milk, cream and broth can be adjusted to your own likeness in richness and thickness.)

 

Enjoy with a leafy green salad and Parmesan crusted bread

 

Hunting and Gathering

GUEST BLOG: In keeping with our theme for October: Hunting and Gathering, here’s a memory from Blake Anderson, who grew up in a tiny northern Minnesota town where hunting was a major part of the autumn culture. Whether the weapon is gun or bow and the prey is deer, bear, pheasant, duck, goose, or grouse, Minnesotans remain passionate about hunting. And some families still depend on hunting for part of their winter’s meat supply.

Learning to Hunt from the Pros – by Blake Anderson

I suppose I was about twenty, and this wasn’t my first hunting experience, but it was one of the most memorable. My Uncle Shep (aka Duane Sheppard) called and asked if I wanted to hunt with him and Cork (aka Arvid Anderson).

Cork liked the area called the “Bull Moose Trail,” about 10 miles west of Backus. I had hunted there on occasion and was familiar with the location. During deer season this long trail attracts a lot of people, so the woods were concentrated pretty heavily with hunters.

The three of us rode out together, and when we arrived at the point of the hunt, we all decided to walk in different directions, agreeing to meet up for a break a few hours into the stand time. It was colder than usual for November, but having grown up in northern Minnesota, I was accustomed to brutal temperatures.

After separating—each of us to our own standing position—I heard other hunters shooting and carrying on. Soon one bullet from another hunting party whizzed literally right past my ear, so I now know what a super close shot sounds like. This might sound weird, but because it makes such a good story, I almost didn’t mind. Though I am not crazy about it ever happening again.

Standing stationary in the same spot in these temperatures began to chill me to the bone, and I was counting the minutes before Shep had told us to meet up. By the time of the pre-determined meeting, the wind was rough and conditions were rugged, even for Minnesota at that time of year. During the hike back, I fantasized about the warmth of the vehicle, hot coffee, and maybe calling it a day.

As I stumbled into the clearing, there stood Cork and Shep with the thermos of coffee on the hood of the car. Their jackets unzipped, laces of their boots loosened, both of them acted like it was 80 degrees. The engine of the car wasn’t even running.

Cork and Shep didn’t complain or act in the least bit cold, and though I couldn’t feel my feet, it was becoming clear that we were not even going to get into the vehicle to warm up. Strangely, after ten minutes of coffee outdoors, laughter, and lively conversation, I felt a little warmer. But all day I kept asking myself “What kind of grit or mettle is this? Where does this kind of fortitude come from?”

I pondered the expression, Standing among Giants. And that day I felt that I had.